Tag Archives: living with Tick Borne Illnesses

Good Press, Bad Press?

I appreciate the frequency with which the NY Times has been covering Lyme Disease, but I wish that would do some more fact checking.

I love the tone of this blog post, written by Hope Reeves. — Yes! Take this seriously. But there’s so information missing that is critical if you want to keep your family safe, and to make sure those who get infected don’t have life long damage from these illnesses. Remember, I was undertreated. I passed lyme to my kids. My serious health issues didn’t debilitate me for 20 years. Know the facts and the theories if you or your family members get the “flu” this summer.

TREATMENT: It horrifies me when all the press that’s coming out this year talks about antibiotics treatment for 2 – 4 weeks for an adult or child. What kind of untrained doctor are these people seeing? Even my family practice doctor treats for a minimum of 6 weeks. Most docs who have any education at all in Lyme Disease will treat for 2 months past the last symptoms. TWO MONTHS.

RASHES: And, the whole rash issue just chaps my ass (pun intended). There are so few rashes. I had a rash that was diagnosed as an allergy to the nickel in my jeans. In 1986, it was a dermatological issue. Even though it was a bullseye.

LOCATION: The focus on the Northeast as primary might make people in other parts of the county feel like they are safe. Not true. I know whole families getting tick bites in Northern California, Florida and all of the country (and beyond).

TRANSMISSION TIME: We focus on Lyme, but we don’t know the transmission time for other tick borne illnesses, and if you are one of the few people these days who gets LYME only from a dirty tick, you should start playing the lottery, because it is VERY rare to have just that illness. And the most traditional doctors admit that Babesiosis needs at LEAST 6 weeks of treatment.

DEER aren’t the only ones to blame: We have to stop blaming the deer. Two of the most common transportation methods for deer ticks? Not the deer but birds and the white footed mouse. And we need more research into mosquitos as vectors. My son had a Bartonella re-infection that was thought to be from a mosquito. And let me remind you, you don’t want your kids to get Bartonella.

So, no matter where you live, even in an urban apartment, if you get ANY flu like symptoms in the summer, just assume it’s a tick borne illness and find a doctor that will treat you properly. Don’t trust that your family doctor has the education YOU need.

I hope the NY Times Motherlode blog and other high profile mama bloggers do some deeper digging so we can protect all kids better.

 

 

Things My Mother Tried To Teach Me

Ten years ago on Mother’s Day, I leaned over to my mother and said, “Happy Mother’s Day, Mama.” She replied, “Shit. I don’t want to die on Mother’s Day.” As if that would matter. Mother’s Day hasn’t been easy since that day. I want to celebrate being a mother and I want to celebrate my children, but having my mother as my mother was such a gift. It’s hard to see this day as anything other than her day. So, in honor of my lovely mother, I am going to post 20 things my mother tried to teach me. Some I learned, some I resisted, some where outright lies.

But she tried. And I love her, still.

1.) Horizontal stripes make you look fat. Vertical stripes make you look slim and tall.

She had this vertically striped dress that was so hideous though. What I wouldn’t give to be able to remind her of that fashion error. So, I’ll say, “Stripes are hideous, Mama,” and leave it at that.

And part two: Always wear patterns. We are a messy lot. You can hide the stains that way.

2.) The Supernatural does exist.

Sometimes, even in a church basement. I love that my mother was a charismatic catholic. I think that is why I love supernatural fiction and urban fantasy. Thanks, mom.

3.) Never speak in public. It’s scary. Could even be life threatening.

My parents were horrified when I joined the speech team in high school. Later, when I coached the team and she was dying (and I was sneaking off from her bedside to still coach a little bit), she wanted to make me buttons to give to the team. SPEECH SAVES LIVES. She believed that speech saved mine.

4.) Never leave the house without lipstick.

Ever

And always carry tissues. Sorry mama, I still haven’t mastered that one. My kids still use their sleeves. Or mine.

5.) Never pass by a restroom without trying to use it. You never know when you will find another one.

Believe me, she followed this one to the letter. Ask anyone. You just never know.

6.) Never leave a pan handle sticking out from the stove. It’s dangerous.

Cooking with an illness induced brain injury isn’t safe either, Mama. Just sayin’.

7.) Never lick a knife.

Not even a table knife. I live on the edge. I let my children lick knives. Even when they are taking blood thinners. It takes particular skill to cut your tongue with a table knife.

8.) God exists. Even if it feels like God has abandoned you, God likely hasn’t.

Yeah, mom. Not buying it.

and part two: It isn’t where you find God, it’s that you find God.

Okay. I’ll buy this one. If I find God in music and in children and in every breath I take that doesn’t cause pain, score one for you.

9.) Never put important things on high shelves.

Thanks, mom. I haven’t mastered this yet, but I need to, since I have one fully frozen shoulder, and one on its way. This never mattered to me when I was well. I was 5′ 8″ to your 5’4″ then, but now, you are right.

10.) There’s safety in numbers.

She didn’t like the idea of settling down with just one love interest. At least not for her children that were in high school. I kept telling her, “Mom, if I have four boyfriends, I look like a slut.” But she was right. It kept me out of trouble.

11.) My husband and son were the most amazing gifts in my life.

Again. Right. They drive me crazy, but she was right.

12.) That my father would have been proud of me.

I don’t know, Mom. It’s easy to make shit up after people are dead.

13.) That I needed to be a writer. I was born to be a writer. And a hospice nurse.

Okay mom. How about a chronically ill writer? Is that a compromise, because it seems a little like a cruel joke. But I guess you knew. Somehow, I would end up tying together sickness/dying with writing.

14.) Be fair. Don’t play favorites.

You weren’t very good at this mom. And you know it.

15.) Perms give you a sense of security no matter how bad they are for your health and well being.

You were so wrong on this one, Mom. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. The last few years of your life, you looked great. I know you went perm free because of me, and for your health, but you looked great!

16.) Coffee enemas are wrong. Just very, very wrong.

Again, mom. Coffee enemas are the bomb. I can’t believe you wouldn’t go for it. “I’d rather die than do coffee enemas.” Yep.

17.) Don’t play with matches. Because my sister did and lit her dress on fire.

Thank you, Barb, for lighting your dress on fire. I would have learned the hard way. I did put a fork in an outlet in 4th grade. Wish you would have warned me.

18.) God has a plan for your life.

Again, really? To be 46 years old, have a mitre valve problem, and who knows what else going wacky in my heart. In addition, I’ve been carrying around a variety of infectious disease for a really long time. Not buying it, mom. God’s plan seems a little mean if you ask me.

19.) Don’t ever have a difficult conversation with someone after dark. Just let it wait until the morning. Then everybody can sleep.

Yes, mom. Brilliant. I wish I remember that more often.

20.) Stick by the people you love, NO MATTER WHAT. Even when you die, never leave them.
Yep. Your were right mom. This is the one that impacted me the most. You will never forget me. You will not leave me orphaned. You will never forget your own.

Happy Mother’s Day, Mama. I wish you were here. We could fight about the perms, Jesus, coffee enemas, and knife licking. And I would savor every word.

Inside the Maelstrom

Today’s visit with the Doctor was terrific. As always, I started in on my symptoms, moved into questions and then I reported in on what I’m taking. BP was 87/60. Not a wide pulse pressure. Little warm at 99.1, especially for this gal, who hovers around 96. Resting pulse of 62. Not bad for someone with a bunch of infectious diseases.

She was even more like the Doctor of my dreams, today. Not sure exactly why, but I threw in the question, “Am I ever going to be well?” Just quickly, in between the sub-clinical MRSA issue and my non-working hip. “Yes, you will be well. You will battle this for the rest of your life–it will be chronic, but someday, you will consider yourself to be ‘well’.”

She went on to explain that I don’t have the birds eye view about our health the way that she does. Apparently, I am hella better than when I first arrived in her little office in downtown Minneapolis 17 months ago. Whew. Glad to know.

She is right. I can’t see it. The old symptoms have been replaced with new ones. Some of them are even harder to handle. There is more grief than ever. I feel like, with my husband’s diagnosis, our world is just beginning to fall apart. But again, she is right. The other shoe dropped, and we are all still standing.

“You are no longer tossed outside the tornado of Lyme,” she told me. “Now, you are in the center of it. It is spinning wildly, and hard to live in, but you are inside now. Working in the chaos.”

I am in the eye of the storm. What other disease is there that makes this a welcome image? Only Lyme. Good EKG. Referral for Water PT in process. She even told me that I’m intuitively working to manage my care just the way I should be. I have Hope. Today, there is only hope. Even if that hope comes from inside the Maelstrom.